If you’ve never been to one of our workshops before, you might never have considered why a drumming workshop could be a useful thing to have at a conference.

Here’s five reasons why they can help make your conference a success:

Why have a drumming team building event at your conference?

Why have a drumming team building event at your conference?

 

1. They reduce stress hormones

Blood samples taken before and after drumming sessions show that stress hormones had been significantly reduced. When stress is high, the body’s ability to create cells for the immune system is decreased – so reducing stress boosts your defences and improves your overall health.

This effect is immediate, so it makes drumming a great way to quickly refresh a large group of people: just what’s needed at the start of a conference!

 

2. They ground you in the present moment

Drumming is all about timing and co-ordination. It also requires a different way of thinking to our general daily thought processes. These factors force the participant to be focused on the present, which is highly therapeutic. It’s a great way to eliminate the build-up of negative feelings from a stressful morning. It also helps to diminish anxieties about the future. This can really help to relax delegates who may be feeling agitated! 

 

3. They release endorphins

Simply put: drumming is fun. It has been shown to release endorphins in the brain, which trigger feelings of happiness and euphoria. It’s a great way to get rid of boredom, restlessness and disinterest in conference delegates. We always find that delegates are far more engaged, enthusiastic and responsive in conferences following a workshop. If you don’t believe us, just look at the Before and After responses participants gave us after a recent corporate event.

 

4. They boost physical energy

As well as giving a great mental boost, drumming gives your body a good wake up call. It’s a physically demanding activity that increases your blood flow and adrenaline. As well as feeling refreshed, delegates often tell us that they enter a conference feeling tired and then feel completely energised. That’s why we think a drumming session after the lunch break in a longer conference is a great idea: no more afternoon slump!

 

5. They build a sense of community

Over the years, we’ve received so many comments from people who were at first sceptical of the team-building power of drumming workshops. They had all changed their minds! Group percussion has been a part of worldwide traditions for thousands of years for a good reason: it’s a great community builder. It teaches us to work together, to listen to each other, and achieve common goals, and provides the shared reward of an exhilarating musical sound! It's a way of illustrating that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Individual rhythms may sound strange or disjointed, but together they create a rich, powerful sound. A great metaphor for working life!

Our drumming workshops rely on co-operation. This helps promote a sense of equality between delegates on different managerial levels, and builds relationships between workers who might not usually interact. In fact, drumming is much easier as a group. It may seem a big challenge to ask delegates with no musical experience to take part - but as more and more rhythms are added, the music can start to sound more stable and become easier to play!

We often show people what happens when a large group plays just one rhythm together. Invariably, the rhythm speeds up and turns into a ‘musical stampede.’ Different rhythms are needed for the music to work. Steve loves bringing this to the forefront in conference ice breakers (especially with Boomwhackers) because it shows how individual roles in business organisations have a purpose for the wider organisations’ achievements. It offers a really powerful motivational message!

We’ve been doing this for over 20 years. If you have a business event coming up and think we could help, we’d love to hear from you!

Contact Us or visit our main Corporate Events page to find out more.

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